Jobs in Amherst, NY

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 4,923 Jobs Available
  • 124,837 Population
  • $49,000 Average Salary
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Amherst Jobs At A Glance

Amherst At A Glance

Amherst is a town in Erie County, a populous suburb of Buffalo. The proverbial college town, Amherst hosts campuses for the University of Buffalo, Medaille College, Bryant and Stratton College, and Daemen College.Aggressive economic development has created tens of thousands of new jobs. Since the 1980s, close to 80% of new jobs in the region came out of Amherst. The minds behind Amherst work to attract business and strengthen its workforce. What follows is a preliminary introduction to their efforts and how it ensures that you'll find work if you persevere.

Job Market in Amherst

Job Market in Amherst

In April 2015, Amherst's unemployment rate was 4.0%. This compared to Erie County's overall 5.3% at that time and the national average of 5.4%. At the end of 2015's first quarter, average wages were $885 a week versus the national's $1,048.Amherst works hard to manage a diversified economy with major industries at its foundation. These include financial services, life science research and services, automotive parts manufacturing, hi-tech and computer manufacturing, and education. Top occupations include food (cooks, servers, fast food), child care and educators, retail and sales, information clerks and receptionists.

Resume Tips For Amherst Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Amherst Jobseekers

Being older and in need of work is a lethal combination. Hiring managers crave experience but lean toward younger candidates for varied reasons, including a willingness to work for less. Don't let your resume date you before you have the chance to get in the door.

  1. A Jobvite survey attests that 93% of recruiters and hiring managers will look for you on the Internet. If you don't at least have a LinkedIn profile, they could assume you're a decade behind the times. Make sure you list any online professional profiles with URLs.
  2. If you use a "references available upon request" line, you're definitely showing your age. Hiring managers know about references and won't care until after the interview.
  3. Employers are far more interested in recent experiences as opposed to how long you've worked. Going back too far can hurt anyone's chances. Your resume shouldn't go further than 10–15 years, no matter how impressed you think older experiences are.
  4. While you can list where you went to school, certifications and awards, if any of them fall outside the 10–15 year window, remove all dates. It's okay to list awards and professional achievements without having them date you.
  5. If you have a mobile phone, use it as a contact number. Far too many people — including hiring managers — find it hard to believe someone wouldn't have one in this day and age. Some see it as an ability to move forward, which never looks good.

How to Find Jobs in Amherst

How to Find Jobs in Amherst

The path to finding work has gone digital. Companies, recruiters and candidates are knee deep in LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and other platforms. That's a tough sell for the less savvy candidate who's older and spends less time glaring at a monitor. For those who aren't proficient in social media, it's time to learn. Until then, here are tips for managing your job search.

  1. If you're an experienced employee, you already know how important networking is. Who you know is as important as your resume. Maybe more. Attend in-person events, follow up with influential insiders, confer with headhunters and consultants, but get the word out.
  2. Regardless of how little you know about the web, learn how to use LinkedIn. In today's market, not having a LinkedIn profile is like trying to get a job without an interview. Your professional online presence starts here.
  3. Hopefully, you've updated your skills regularly. If you're finding your talents don't align with current job openings, you may be out of touch with the latest skills. You could need independent training to remain competitive.
  4. Resorting to snail mail is a nice, old fashioned way to reach out. Trust that in a world of overcrowded inboxes, a letter and resume submitted this way will be given a closer look. Be sure to include an email address for a response.
  5. Bottom line: if you expect to embark on an effective job search in the 21st century, you need to use the Internet. Start with LinkedIn. Once you see how useful it can be, you'll want to expand your knowledge base.