Jobs in Allentown, PA

  • 755,838 Resumes
  • 1,552 Jobs Available
  • 119,104 Population
  • $52,000 Average Salary
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Allentown Jobs At A Glance

Allentown At A Glance

Allentown. It's Pennsylvania's third largest city. In the 19th century, it was a community built on Dutch farming. By the early 20th century, Allentown would be a hub for local farming and food marketing. Even today, the city has one of the most popular farmers markets in the state. Allentown would also become a thriving center for manufacturing. Today, the city has shifted toward a diverse business focus. With a mission for long range economic growth, they foster programs that stimulate growth and job creation.Following the city's job market would be a good idea if you're looking for work. You're also going to need the best strategies for finding work and getting that resume ready. The content below will be invaluable as you navigate prospects.

Job Market in Allentown

Job Market in Allentown

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics's last surveys, the U.S. unemployment rate is 4.9%. The Allentown area has a rate of 5.0%. City-data.com says the service sector is the city's dominant employer, growing at a rapid pace with a number of businesses reporting difficulty finding qualified candidates. Top industries are government, trade, transportation and utilities, education and health services. Manufacturing still has a prominent role in the economy. The region's current average weekly wages are $938. The national average is $1,048.

Resume Tips For Allentown Jobseekers

Resume Tips For Allentown Jobseekers

Allentown may be the friendliest place in the world, but when it comes to competing for a job, it's dog-eat-dog. Your resume has to come out swinging, knocking other candidates to the side. Here are tips to help do that.

  1. Keep a master resume that contains anything you might ever want in your resume. Constantly update it, editing and adding as necessary. When the time comes, you'll have a library of information to pull from, creating a tailored resume perfect for the situation in front of you.
  2. A social media resume is a good way to brand your identity. It has the distinction of being an online resource for recruiters that are looking for candidates with your skills, education and background. It can contain charts, graphs, images, video and anything else that brands you.
  3. If your field is in the creative arts, marketing or sales, an infographic resume could be an excellent way to catch a hiring manager's attention. We'd keep a conventional resume on file anyway with a link to the infographic.
  4. Pump up your resume with numbers, facts and figures. If you supervised, put in how many people. If the project made or saved money, list how much. Generalized statements about "filing" and "handling customer complaints" no longer cut it.
  5. Include your LinkedIn URL because hiring managers will likely look for you anyway. Include any industry blogs you write, as long as they're professional and family-friendly.

How to Find Jobs in Allentown

How to Find Jobs in Allentown

Sometimes the job you have just isn't the one you want. While they say the best time to look for work is when you're working, you have to be careful. Here are some dos and don'ts for job hunting under your employer's nose.

  1. Don't tell anyone that has even a remote connection to your job. You may end up contacting a colleague or rival company that might be interested, but make discretion a priority. One exception is when everyone knows layoffs are pending. It's a time where openly looking for work is acceptable.
  2. Avoid publicly reporting you're looking for a job. While you definitely want to keep your LinkedIn and other professional profiles up-to-date, and have an updated resume ready to go, share the information quietly.
  3. If hiring managers ask about why you want to leave your job, reveal how you're looking for new opportunities, hit the ceiling professionally, and they're a company you admire and would be honored to work for. Don't talk negatively about current employers and never say anything like "more money. "
  4. As stated, unless layoffs are on the horizon, do not use current coworkers, supervisors or management as references. Make it clear to hiring managers you'd rather they not contact anyone you work with.
  5. Do not use company resources to search for new work. Many companies track what their computers are used for. They may also monitor phone calls. That means not listing any business information as contact info.